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Creek Hill Nursery

17 West Main Street
Leola, PA 17540
888-565-0050
info@creekhillnursery.com

Aster
'Bluebird'

FOOD & COLOR FOR THE FALL

Totally covered in flowers,
striking robin's egg blue.
Late season pollen for the bee's winter larder.

Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird

Lonicera
'Major Wheeler'

NECTAR ON THE FLY

More red, more flowers and more rebloom than the species. Specializes in support for North American long-tongue pollinators.

Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird

Monarda
'Midnight Oil'

THE BRONZY BEE BALM

Chocolately red foliage showcase pale lavender flowers. Earlier blooms, more vigor and better disease resistance than the species.

SHIPPING LATERCART
MON Midnight Oil 21
W29
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird

Amsonia
'Butterscotch'

TWO SEASONS OF COLOR

Better than hubrichtii. In spring, icy blue colors last longer with more show. In fall, golden foliage has striking red stems. Less tip dieback.

SHIPPING LATERCART
AMS Butterscotch 72
W35
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird

Iris
'Purple Flame'

EMERGES EGGPLANT PURPLE

Emerges with solid eggplant purple aging to bright green. Handles soggy soils, even when crown is submerged. Classic versicolor flags.

SHIPPING LATERCART
IRI Purple Flame 50
W30, W46
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird
Aster Bluebird

Amsonia Butterscotch Amsonia Butterscotch
Aster Bluebird Aster Bluebird
Iris Purple Flame Iris Purple Flame
Lonicera Major Wheeler Lonicera Major Wheeler

ASTER 'BLUEBIRD'
AMSONIA 'BUTTERSCOTCH'
IRIS 'PURPLE FLAME'
LONICERA 'MAJOR WHEELER'
MONARDA 'MIDNIGHT OIL'

Five Natives of Note

Click Here for Full List of Natives

The increased demand for native perennials comes from a deep desire among gardeners and communities to strengthen and reconnect with local ecosystems. Planting North American species in the garden and landscape does exactly that. The shared history provides food, homes, and hiding places for the birds, butterflies, and bees.

Originally, gardens separated themselves from native landscapes by using exotic, highly cultivated plants. However, as undeveloped spaces became more rare, so did the species and natural beauty that came with them. Now, the trend has reversed and gardeners want to re-integrate into their natural surroundings with native perennials.

A barrier to wider adoption is a reputation for thuggish behavior, weedy habits, or unattractive appearance. The solutions are better native varieties that retain their ecosystem support and work well within gardens and landscapes commonly found in American towns. By carefully selecting individuals of a wild species with desirable traits, modern horticulture now provides numerous natives that are attractive and well-behaved for the gardener and useful to the local ecosystem.

These five plants are both good natives and good perennials. Handsome enough to be sold and planted side by side with more intensively bred exotic varieties, they also have an authenticity that wouldn’t be out of place in a strictly native landscape planting.

We felt these excellent varieties deserved to have their merits showcased. Each one is an improvement. Some have more flowers, appealing to us and useful to pollinators. Some have impressive foliage that extends their season of color. Because of their strengths, they are as beautiful to us as they are important to the fauna that depend on them. 


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